The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) heard a case earlier this year, Birchfield v. North Dakota, that involved two issues related to DUI breath test:

  • Do the police need a warrant to conduct a breath test on a suspected drunk driver?
  • Do the police need a warrant to conduct a blood test on a suspected drunk driver?

Breath Tests:

On the 23rd of June this year, the SCOTUS announced their decision. In a 6-2-majority opinion, Justice Alito held that police don’t need a warrant to conduct a breath test on defendants. Weighing several factors, Justice Alito explained that a breath test does not amount to a physical intrusion on the suspect’s body. Unlike blood or DNA, breath tests can only provide police officers with one piece of information: the concentration of alcohol in a person’s breath. There is nothing else a breath test can provide the police. Furthermore, there is nothing retained. Unlike a blood sample, which can be kept in a vial indefinitely, breath is fleeting and uncontainable. As such, the court held that states could conduct these warrantless tests and punish those for refuse to take it.

Blood Tests:

However, the court held by a 7-1 majority that blood tests do require a warrant. These tests, Alito wrote, are “significantly more intrusive” because they require a technician to puncture the suspect’s skin with a needle to draw the blood. The blood, unlike breath, can be retained indefinitely, and provides a wide range of information that goes beyond alcohol concentration. This means that state laws that penalize a suspect for refusing to take a blood test are unconstitutional. Accordingly, we can expect to see police departments emphasizing the use of breath tests over the intrusive blood tests in order to order to fight drunk driving.

For a more in-depth analysis, check out SCOTUS Blog’s article on this case. For the more adventurous reader, you can read the case itself:

http://www.scotusblog.com/2016/06/opinion-analysis-states-prevail-on-breath-but-not-blood-tests-without-a-warrant/

https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/15pdf/14-1468_8n59.pdf

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

Gravity. Our nemesis ever since our first steps, gravity has tried to keep us down our entire lives. But each morning we get out of bed and stand up in defiance to gravity. We go about our daily business without much thought of the eternal force weighing us down. That is until our feet betray us and down we fall. Whether it’s a slippery floor, a vacuum cord, or an uneven step, occasionally we fall victim to gravity’s embrace.

Sometimes it’s a pure accident. But more often than not the cause of our fall is the result of someone else’s negligence. A slip and fall is sometimes no big deal. We go down and then get up with only minor pain, maybe a scrap knee or a bruise. Other times, however, we go down and break a bone or tear a ligament. There are falls that at first only cause minor pain, but progressively worsen as time goes on. These type of falls require medical treatment; treatment that can last months or years. When you are out somewhere and you trip or slip, then keep these steps in mind:

  • If Needed, Seek Medical Attention. The most important thought going through your mind should be your physical well-being, or the health of your loved one. If you are in pain or otherwise injured, call for medical attention immediately. Don’t get angry or upset at the store employees or the owner of the property. It will do nothing to help your pain or case. Focus on your health because that is the top priority.
  • Report It. Be sure to report your fall to the owner or manager of wherever you fell at (even if you fell at your friend’s house, report to them what happened). If you fell at a commercial location, report the fall to the manager and ask for a copy of their accident report. If you did report the fall but didn’t ask for a copy of the accident report you can still ask for a copy.
  • Take Photos. Assuming you were not whisked away in an ambulance, be sure to take plenty of photos, especially the location where you fell. Also, photograph everything around the area you fell. This includes stairs, railings, wires or cords on the ground, any ice or puddles, and anything else that is nearby. Be sure to document the date and time of your accident with the set of photos. Be sure to make a note of the weather and temperature if the fall happened outside.
  • Get the Info. In order to help your case it is important to gather names, phone numbers, and addresses of anyone who saw the fall. Witnesses are important to back up your story when other pieces of evidence don’t.
  • Keep Track of Your Medical Documents. Depending on extent of the injury you will receive medical treatment. Keep and save the bills and other forms you receive from your doctor. You will use the medical costs to determine how much the other side owes you in damages. The opposing party will want copies of them, too, so make duplicates.
  • Call an Attorney. In order to juggle the different parties and your medical treatment it is highly recommended to hire an attorney when considering a lawsuit. By their nature, slip and fall cases are difficult to prove in a trial. Often, opposing counsel will cast the blame on you for not exercising reasonably care. Moreover, initial settlement offers from insurance companies are generally low. That is why you need an experience attorney to be your champion. Insurance companies do not wish to spend resources going to trial, and will take your claim more seriously if you have an attorney representing you.
  • To Sum Up. Above all, if you are in pain get medical help. That is your top priority. Report the fall as soon as you can so there is documentation that you fell, but your first concern should be your health. Have someone that is with you at the time of the fall take pictures of the area for you. Finally, contact an attorney to go over your legal options.

Call us today if you slipped and fell. We will determine what your legal options are and what your compensatory damages could be. We will do our best to get you the maximum amount possible.

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

The quality of nursing and retirement homes varies, just like anything else in society. Some nursing homes are beacons of compassion; a safe harbor where our loved ones can live out their twilight years in comfort and peace. But too often we hear of elder abuse: abusive nursing staff, deteriorating facilities, and unsanitary living conditions.

Not only is it disheartening to hear of such reports, for the families of these residents it is horrifying to discover what their parents or grandparents are going through. Families wonder why on earth their relative didn’t tell them what was going on. However, it’s important to understand that sometimes their parent or grandparent has no idea that they are being abused or neglected; other times, they are too scared to speak up.

If you suspect something is not right at the nursing facility keep an eye out for red flags. Visit the nursing facility without notifying your loved one or nursing staff ahead of time. Often times staff cover up abuse during normal visit hours, so try to visit early in the morning or late in the evening.

Keep an eye out for anything unusual. Messy rooms can be signs of abuse, but take note of blood or mysterious stains on your loved one’s sheets or clothing. Also, not picking up trash or waste in days indicates neglect.

But the most obvious signs of abuse will be concerning your loved one themselves. Your loved one may outright complain of mistreatment. If so, take it as fact and consider talking to an elder abuse attorney immediately. Otherwise, look out for signs like broken bones, burns, unexplained bruises, or deep cuts. Take these injuries seriously, and be critical of explanations by the staff. The reason your loved one is in a nursing home is so these things don’t happen.

There are other physical signs that are noticeable after repeated visits, too. Frequent bedsores or infections, hair loss, dramatic weight gain or weight loss, or a steady decline in health overall are red flags that something is wrong. Ask your loved one about these symptoms, and consider speaking to an attorney.

Finally, watch out for changes in behavior, emotional health, and spending. Watch how they interact with staff or if they act differently when staff is nearby. Whispering or talking in a low voice when a nurse walks by should alert you to a potential problem. Also, check on your loved ones savings to be sure there aren’t any unusual transactions and keep an eye out for missing personal belongings or items.

Elder abuse needs to be taken seriously and addressed immediately. Our loved ones should not be living out their final years in agony, fear, or neglect.

For more signs or information on types of abuse, check out:

http://www.ncea.aoa.gov/faq/index.aspx

Lee & Lee P.S. understands how devastating elder abuse can be. Please call us if you suspect your loved ones are being mistreated or abused. We’ll go over your case and advise you on your legal options moving forward.

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

According to the Regional Center Business Journal, EB-5 is stronger than ever. Since 2008, the program has surged in popularity. In an article written by IIUSA Policy Analyst Lee Li, he describes how six data points demonstrate how successful EB-5 has become.

  • Foreign Direct Investment: In fiscal year (FY) 2015, the EB-5 program generated about $4.4 billion ($4,378,000,000) in foreign direct investment (FDI), or about $12 million every day. To put that in perspective, that is more money than the GDP of Barbados. Since FY 2008, FDI has gone from $3.2 million to $4.4 billion in FY 2015. That is a growth rate of over 1,260%.
  • I-526 Stats: The number of I-526 petitions filed increased by 31% from FY 2014 to FY 2015 to a historic high of 14,373 petitions. However, it increased by over a 1000% since FY 2008 when the number of petitions that year was fewer than 2,000. In addition, USCIS has completed more than 9,800 petitions in FY 2015. That is a 54% increase since the year before. This isn’t to say that the I-526 process is without problems; the high volume has caused a massive backlog of petitions waiting to be processed. USCIS will need to reform the I-526 to better streamline the increased number of applicants.
  • I-829 Stats: The approval rate of I-829 petitions in FY 2015 was 99%. That is the best rate the EB-5 program has ever had, and well above the FY 2008-2015 average of 92%.
  • Reaching the 10,000 Visa Cap: For the second year in a row the EB-5 visas have hit the 10,000-cap limit. For comparison, the government issued only 291 EB-5 visas in FY 2000 and fewer than 2,000 in FY 2010.
  • Processing Times: Due to the high volume of petitions, processing times for I-526’s, I-829’s, and I-924’s have unfortunately increased. For example, I-829 petitions used to take about 9 months to be process. Now they take over 15 months. I-526 petitions take 14 months and I-924 petitions take nearly 12 months. Although this is not welcoming news to applicants of these petitions, it is indicative of the success that the EB-5 program is having.
  • The Rise of Regional Centers: In FY 2008 there were only 28 regional centers in the United States. By FY 2015 that number increased to 740.

With investment equaling that of a small nation, the EB-5 program has proven its worth. It is without question that the government reform the process in order to speed up the processing times. USCIS has recently said that they will be hiring more staff to help achieve that goal. In broader view, however, Congress ought to expand the visa cap in order to allow more immigrants and more investment into this country.

For more details on these data points see the article at:

https://iisusa.org/blog/research-analysis/9721/

For more data immigration overall, please go to:

www.uscis.gov/tools/reports-studies/immigration-forms-data

If you have questions about the EB-5 process, then give us a call. If you are considering an EB-5 visa it is highly recommended that you speak to an immigration attorney. An EB-5 immigration attorney will increase the likelihood of you receiving a visa.

Lee & Lee P.S. has helped hundreds of foreign investors navigate the complex EB-5 process successfully.  Let us help you, too!

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

One of the most dangerous things a reasonable person can do is to drive drunk. A DUI can not only result in physical harm to you or others, it can destroy your reputation, your savings, and so much more. Mistakes in judgment do happen though; we are human after all. If you are pulled over by the police try to keep the following in mind:

  • Remain Calm. When you are pulled over it is important to keep in mind that the officer is observing everything you do. Try not to stop abruptly, drift in and out of lanes, or hit the curb or guardrail as you pull off the road. Such behavior could be used as evidence against you in court.
  • Be Polite and Respectful. Have everything ready (driver’s license, registration, and proof of insurance) before the officer is at your window. When the officer talks to you, do not be argumentative or rude. Your attitude towards the officer can be used against you in court. It is better to have the judge hear that you were cooperative and polite than disrespectful.
  • Do Not Lie. The worst thing you could do during a DUI stop is lie. Lying destroys your credibility in court and makes it difficult to mount a strong defense. Instead, when the officer asks if you have been drinking, politely tell the officer, “I would like to speak with an attorney before I answer questions.” This phrase is your best defense in a DUI situation. Once said, refuse to answer any questions until you talk to an attorney.
  • Decline to Take the Field Sobriety Tests. These tests (like reciting the alphabet, standing on one leg, walking a straight line, etc.) are voluntary. You do not have to do them if you do not want to. Tell the officer that you do not wish to do them. The officer is likely to warn you that refusing to do the FSTs will result in your arrest and/or suspension of your driver’s license. This is true, but it is also true that by this point the officer was probably going to arrest you anyway.
  • Take the Breath Test At The Police Station. Unless you spoke to an attorney that told you otherwise, take the breath test at the police station. Refusing to take the breath test can be used against you in court and increase the mandatory minimum sentence if you are found guilty of a DUI. The breath test is more reliable than FSTs and courts tend to trust the results.
  • Sometimes an officer will ask you to take a portable breath test (PBT). This test is voluntary, just like the FSTs. DO NOT CONFUSE THE TWO TEST! The PBT is voluntary and refusing to take it will not be used against you in trial. The breath test at the police station, while technically voluntary, has severe penalties if you refuse to take it. Take the one at the police station, unless your attorney tells you otherwise.

Bottom Line. Do not lie and ask to talk with an attorney before you answer any questions. It would not be a bad idea to have an attorney on speed dial on your phone.

If you ever find yourself facing a DUI charge give us a call. Several of our attorneys are former prosecutors and are intimately familiar with the criminal justice system. We can go over your legal options and represent your case in court.

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

A car accident is something that we know can happen any time we get into a car. We hear of wrecks on the morning news. We see fender-benders on the evening commute. We use the event of a car accident as a measuring rod on how safe another activity is, like flying on a plane, or how likely an event is to occur, like being struck by lightning. We know that an accident can happen, but do we know what to do once it does? Consider the following:

  1. Make sure you are all right before you exit your vehicle: Check for any injuries. If you’re bleeding, disorientated, or otherwise experiencing significant pain call an ambulance. When in doubt if you are injured, call an ambulance.
  2. DO NOT LEAVE THE SCENE: It is crucial that you remain at the scene of the accident, especially if someone was injured or killed. Leaving the scene of an accident, even if you believe there is minor damage, can result in you being charged in a felony hit-and-run.
  3. Call the Police If Needed: Generally, you should call the police for any accident with noticeable damage or injuries. That way there will be a police report filed so there will be documentation of the accident. A police report is regarded as reliable by courts, and is likely to be your strongest piece of evidence (or most damaging depending on who was at fault).
  4. Check on All Drivers and Passengers: See if everyone else in the accident is all right. Obviously, call for help if anyone is hurt. If there is an imminent danger (like a car sinking in a body of water or car on fire) move people out of harm’s way. Otherwise, do not move injured people and especially do not move their neck. Let the paramedics take care of them.
  5. Exchange Information with the Other Driver(s): When obtaining everyone’s contact information, do not be emotional or disrespectful. It will get you nowhere. Exchange phone numbers, names, insurance information, and driver’s license. Also, don’t apologize. You may think that it was your fault, but other factors could be at play. Be respectful and helpful, but do not take blame.
  6. Talk to Any Witnesses: Get the contact information of anyone who saw the accident.
  7. Snap Pictures of Everything: A picture may say a thousand words, but they are invaluable at trial. After police reports, pictures are the most powerful pieces of evidence a party could have. Take a picture of everything; not just the vehicles but also the road and surrounding area. If there are skid marks or broken glass, then take pictures of those, too. Try to create a thorough documentation of what the scene of the accident looked like.
  8. Call Your Insurance Company: You will probably dread doing this, but it is critically important that you inform your insurance company right away. Be honest with what happened and give them all the facts. Lying to your insurance company could result in you losing coverage for the accident.
  9. Be Suspicious of Immediate Settlement Offers: The other driver’s insurance company (or sometimes even your own) will try to save themselves some money by trying to settle with you as soon as possible. They will offer you a low offer but it would be immediately available. Be careful. Some injuries from car accidents don’t appear until days or weeks after an accident. That low settlement offer may not pay for all of the treatment. Once you sign a settlement though you lose your chance to collect any more money. So talk to your own lawyer before accepting an offer to settle your claim.
  10. Think about Calling an Attorney: If the accident caused substantial damage to your car or significant injury to yourself or others, consider hiring an attorney to help you deal with the insurance companies.

If you’ve been involved in an automobile accident give us a call today. We’ll go over your case and advise you what legal options you have to maximize your damages.

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

Theft

Is he a robber? A thief? No! He’s a burglar, who intends to  commit and does commit robbery, which is a special kind of theft. So really all of the above.

 

Burglary and burglar. Theft and thief. Robbery and robber. We have all seen and heard these terms before, either on the news, in books (do people still read for fun anymore?) or in movies. For example:

  1. “The police arrest two teenagers last night for burglarizing a local church…”
  2. “The thief waited patiently until everyone had left the room before he stole the painting…”
  3. “The stagecoach robbers managed to escape before sunrise…”

We look at these terms and think we know what they mean. After all, we see them almost on a daily basis. Context tells us that they all involve stealing something. But do we really know the distinction between robber and burglar, or theft and robbery? In order to demonstrate the distinctions, let’s look back at the examples above and exchange the terms.

The first example now reads as “the police arrested two teenagers last night for thieving (for you perfectionist, “stealing”) a local church”, or “the police arrested two teenagers last night for robbing a local church.” Obviously, the teenagers did not physically remove the church from its location so we know that there is a distinction between burglary and theft.

However, it sounds correct and plausible for the teenagers to be arrested for robbing a local church. There is no distinction here. Let’s skip to the third example. That example now reads as “the stagecoach thieves managed to escape before sunrise”, or “the stagecoach burglars managed to escape before sunrise.” I think we can all agree that using the terms “thieves” or “burglars” here does not feel quite right. But why? What exactly is the difference between the three?

Burglary actually is not the same as stealing, nor is stealing necessarily a component of burglary. Burglary is the crime of breaking and entering into a structure for the purpose of committing a crime. The “breaking” does not even have to be forceful; an open window is enough.

Suppose the teenagers in the first example live across the street from the church and their parents are gone for the weekend. Late Saturday night they walk home from a party. Unfortunately, they forgot their keys at the party and don’t know where the spare key is. With dead cell phones and no desire to walk back to their friend’s house, they walk across the street to the church. They are surprised to find that the church door is unlocked. They enter and use the church’s phone to call their parents to ask them where the spare key is hidden.

Is this burglary? No, because the purpose of their breaking and entering was not to commit a crime but to call for assistance. At best this is trespassing, but given the circumstances the church minister would likely forgive them. However, if the teenagers entered the church with the purpose of stealing the offering money that is collected, that would then be burglary.

To add a layer of complexity, let’s use the locked-out-of-house scenario again. After calling their parents, they’re about to leave when they see a diamond necklace sitting on the altar (work with me here). Foolishly, they grab the necklace and go home. The next day the police arrest the two because the church’s security camera caught them. Can the police arrest them for burglary? No, because once again their purpose for breaking and entering into the church was to call for help, not to commit a crime. They will be charged with theft (but not robbery).

Theft, also known as larceny, is when a person intentionally and fraudulently takes personal property of another without permission or consent and with the intent to convert it to his or her use. Basically, theft is stealing while embezzlement and robbery are specific kinds of theft. Burglary may involve stealing, but not always. Petty theft is stealing property with a low value while grand theft is the stealing of property of high value.

Robbery is the direct taking of property from a victim through force, threat or intimidation. Armed robbery is robbery that involves a deadly weapon like a gun, knife, or a club. Back to the church example with the diamond necklace. The stealing of the necklace is theft (grand theft), but not robbery because it was not directly stolen from the owner of the necklace. In other words, the teenagers did not take the necklace from the victim’s person. The teenagers were thieves, not robbers.

Suppose when the minister enters the church on Sunday morning and sees that the necklace is gone he exclaims, “we’ve been robbed!” Is he correct? No! Well, not technically correct. He is the victim of a theft, but not of a robbery. So next time you hear someone exclaim “I’ve been robbed”, gently correct them. Instead, what they should say is: “I am the victim of a theft!” Although it doesn’t help them retrieve their property, at least they are using the correct legal term.

I know embezzlement is not in the title or part of the examples, but I ought to define it. Embezzlement is the stealing of funds or property of an employer, company or government or misappropriating money or assets held in a trust. This is a typical white collar crime, and is rarely confused with burglary and robbery. Embezzlement relates more closely to fraud, and people often confuse it with bribery and extortion. The explanation for those terms will have to wait for another day.

If you have questions about any of the above or are in need of legal representation please contact us today!

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

dog attacks

There are over 1,000 attacks reported every day in the U.S.

Many of us are dog lovers. We just cannot resist the urge to approach a dog we see in public. We see dogs in parks, on front lawns, on sidewalks walking their owners (who really owns whom?). But all of us, dog lover or not, have at least once in our lives been intimidated or threatened by man’s best friend. And an unlucky few of us have been victims of dog attacks. We walk down a street, turn a corner, and come face to face with a snarling, growling canine. What do we do?

First, it is important that you stay calm. Even if dogs can’t smell fear (and I’m pretty sure they can), waving your arms and screaming is a dead give away. Dogs are predators by nature. If you act like a scared bunny it’s going to treat you like a scared bunny. So stand tall and keep cool.

Which brings me to my second point: do not run. I know that your instinct is to flee from danger, but ask yourself: can I outrun a German Shepard? The answer is no, so do not try. Instead, calmly and slowly move away from the dog. Do not make eye contact with the animal, but keep him in your peripheral vision. In order words, do not turn your back to him. If you make a calm retreat, the dog is more likely to let you leave his territory.

If the dog persists in being aggressive, however, you need a shield and a sword. Look around you. If there is a large stick, grab it and hold it out towards the dog while slowly retreating. If you are wearing a backpack or a heavy coat take it off and use it as a shield. If the dog charges and you have nothing else, grab a rock and chuck it at him. A rock is likely to startle the dog, but remember: do not run. If the rock stops the charge, pick up another rock and keep throwing until the dog backs off. Stand your ground until it is safe to walk away.

If the dog does attack you, then fight like hell. You’re going to think I am crazy, but offer one of your forearms to the dog. This will leave you three other limbs to fight back with and to protect your throat. Kick, punch, or stomp at the animal with all of your might. Do not stop fighting back until the dog let’s go. Once the dog lets go and backs off, resume holding what you had to shield or protecting yourself and slowly back away to safety. Do not turn your back on the dog.

Once you are safe, see a medical professional immediately if you have serious wounds. If the wounds are not serious (use your best judgment), then:

  • Take a picture of your wounds;
  • If people witnessed your attack, then you need to get their contact information;
  • If possible get the name and address of the dog’s owner or those who had custody of the dog at the time. This may not be possible at the time of the attack;
  • Go see a doctor as soon as possible to get treatment and to ensure you don’t have any diseases from the bites like rabies. Also, have your doctor document the bites; and
  • Report the attack to animal control, the police department, humane society or whatever agency does animal control in your city. The agency will likely ask for the contact information of any witnesses so give it to them if you have it. But most importantly, the agency needs to know who the owner of the dog is. If you have that information, great. But if not, you need to find this out either by asking people that live in the area or perhaps asking one of the witnesses if they know.

It is important to report any dog attacks, even if the wounds are minor, because the owner needs to be held accountable for their dog’s behavior. You may have got away relatively unscathed, but next week that same aggressive dog could attack a child and that child may not be so lucky.

If you or your loved ones (furry or not) have been the victims of a dog attack, please contact us today. We will go over your case and determine what legal options are available to you.

For reporting dog attacks in the city of Seattle, contact Seattle Animal Control at (206) 386-7387 or visit their website at: http://www.seattle.gov/animal-shelter/animal-control

For King County, contact Regional Animal Services of King County at (206) 296-7387 or visit them at: http://www.kingcounty.gov/depts/regional-animal-services/animal-control-response.aspx

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.

liberty

The EB-5 Program is attracting more foreign investors than ever before

It should come as no surprise that Chinese nationals make up the vast majority of EB-5 visa recipients. After all, China has the largest population in the world with over 1.3 billion citizens. In fiscal year 2014, Chinese immigrants received 9,128 out of the 10,692 visas issued. Rounding out the Top 5 were South Korea (225), Mexico (129), Taiwan (126) and Vietnam (121). Russia was the only other nation to receive more than 100 visas.

But someone appears to have spilled the beans. More nations are starting to increase their participation in the EB-5 program. Chinese immigrants received a thousand fewer visas in fiscal year 2015 (8,156). Meanwhile, Vietnam (280), Taiwan (139), and India (111) saw significant increases in visas. The non-Chinese share of visas increased to 16.5% in 2015 from 14.6% in 2014. Visas issued to citizens of Vietnam have more than doubled (a 131% increase), and Taiwan is steadily increasing their share as well.

India, however, appears to be making the greatest surge. In 2011, USCIS only issued 37 EB-5 visas to Indians. But that number jumped to 96 in 2014, and 130 visas in the first 70 days of 2016 alone! That is a 50% jump each year for the last five years. With the second largest population in world after China, it should come as no surprise that India is rising. It will be fascinating to see how this will affect the EB-5 program in the years to come.

Please contact Lee & Lee P.S. to learn more about the EB-5 Visa Program. We would be more than happy to assist you with the entire process and provide information on EB-5 projects and regional centers. Contact us today!

For more data on employment and other immigrant visas issued by USCIS, please check out the links below:

https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/law-and-policy/statistics/annual-reports/report-of-the-visa-office-2015.html

https://www.uscis.gov/tools/reports-studies/reports-and-studies

 

—Disclaimer—
This article is made available by Lee & Lee, PS for educational purposes only. The intent is to give the reader general information and a general understanding of the law. The article does not provide specific legal advice. Readers of this article should understand that there is no attorney client relationship between you and the writers. Furthermore, the article is not a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your jurisdiction.